Graham's Humax Notes

As an old Tivo hacker, my first thoughts, on acquiring a Humax HDR-2000T, were how to make it even more useful.

The following hacks do not run on the Humax, but on Linux systems to interface to the Humax HDR-2000T. I have no idea if they are useful with other Humax boxes. Nor have I attempted to make them work on Windows, although if anyone wants to do so please contact me (via github is probably easiest).

Tools

backup-humax

backup-humax is a script which backs up the media directories (encrypted) from a Humax PVR to a local disk in case the Humax disk needs to be replaced.

humax-unenc-ftp

humax-unenc-ftp is a script which clears the ENC flag from all recordings on a Humax PVR remotely. This is similar to using the well known Foxy program, but done for all recordings remotely.

hmt2k

hmt2k is a script which emulates the existing hmt program but which is open source and can access .hmt files either locally or using FTP to the Humax. It is located in the same repository as humax-unenc-ftp.

dlna-media-archive

dlna-media-archive is a script which mirrors all the content from a DLNA media server to local files.

ssdp-fake

ssdp-fake is a script which allows remote DLNA Media Servers (on another LAN) to be visible on your LAN.

This is not specific to the Humax (I also use it to access my NAS Media Server from my mobile phone) but I use it to access my Humax Media Server from my main home network, and to allow the Humax to access my NAS Media Server.

File formats

raydon has done great work on reverse-engineering the formats of internal files on the Humax. These formats (and any later changes) can be found in a GitHub Gist.

Accessing recorded content from the Humax

The Humax encrypts all recordings on disk. However, it is willing to decrypt SD material (but not normally HD material), so there are extra complexities in accessing HD material.

Accessing SD material

There are two ways to access SD material from your Humax HDR-2000T: USB disk or DLNA.

USB disk

Insert a USB disk (external disk drive or a USB memory stick) into the USB port, and then use the remote control to copy the recording onto the USB disk. If the recording is SD, it will be decrypted during the copy.

DLNA

If you have a DLNA client device (such as a smartphone or PC) you can stream the recording. from the Humax DLNA server.

If you want to save the unencrypted recording on disk, you can use my dlna-media-archive tool to download it from the media server.

Accessing HD material

Accessing HD material is more complicated, because the Humax will not automatically decrypt HD material.

USB disk

First, you need to clear the ENC flag so the Humax will decrypt the material. You can use my humax-unenc-ftp tool to clear the ENC flag on all recordings. Using this tool, without the --rename option, is believed to be safe (although I cannot take any responsibility).

Secondly, insert a USB disk (external disk drive or a USB memory stick) into the USB port, and then use the remote control to copy the recording onto the USB disk.

DLNA, with manual copy

Using DLNA is more complex: as well as clearing the ENC flag, it is necessary to then get the DLNA server to reindex the recording so it notices the flag has changed. The safest way to do that is with a manual copy.

First, you need to clear the ENC flag so the Humax will decrypt the material. You can use my humax-unenc-ftp tool to clear the ENC flag on all recordings. Using this tool, without the --rename option is believed to be safe (although I cannot take any responsibility).

Secondly, use the remote control to move the recording to another directory or change the recording name.

Then, wait an indeterminate amount of time for the DLNA server to reindex.

Lastly, stream the recording or use dlna-media-archive tool to download it.

DLNA, with automatic renaming

This method is experimental. It is not believed to cause any major problems, although if a recording is being played when it is renamed, an extra file will be created on the disk (a corrupted version of the .hmt file under the original name). This file does not appear to cause any problems, except taking up a very small amount of space.

With this approach, you specify the --rename option on the humax-unenc-ftp command. This causes the files associated with the recording to be renamed on the disk, without changing the name that appears in the recording listing. Note that this only happens for recordings which are having the ENC flag cleared, so the --rename option must be specified in the humax-unenc-ftp command which is actually clearing the ENC flag. The renaming causes the DLNA server to reindex the file (at some indeterminate time in the future, normally between a few minutes and overnight.).

Then, wait an indeterminate amount of time for the DLNA server to reindex.

Lastly, stream the recording or use dlna-media-archive tool to download it.

Automatic archiving or mirroring

To keep an automatic archive or mirror of all content from the humax, it is necessary to run both humax-unenc-ftp and dlna-media-archive frequently.

For example, you can use a tool like cron to run something like:

	 humax-unenc-ftp --rename humax
	 dlna-media-archive "HDR-2000T*" --destination /nas/humax-archive
       

Of course, you may want to add --delete and/or --flat to the dlna-media-archive command.

The commands will only work if the Humax is on, so you need to run them when the Humax is normally in use.

Donations

If you have found any of my software useful, please consider supporting the Free Software Foundation. [FSF Associate Member] Free Software, Free Society

IMPORTANT NOTES

Humax is a trademark of Humax Co. Ltd. This page and software is not created, endorsed, reviewed, approved or in any other way associated with Humax Co. Ltd.


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Graham Cobb